Category Archives: Y History

Know Your Rights: Dos and Don’ts

Last Thursday, The Black Student Movement and the Campus Y co-hosted an event offering non-official advice for what students should and should not do when interacting with the police.

The event featured a panel consisted of Ada Wilson-Suitt, who currently serves as Director of Inclusive Student Excellence at UNC and previously was a practicing attorney.  The panel also featured Michael Jones and Ariel Smallwood, both second year law students at the UNC School of Law and President and Vice President of Black Law Student Association respectively.

The panelists wanted to make it clear they are not experts, but still gave excellent advice. Here are some of their tips:

1) Download the ACLU app. The app has a built in recording device that records both visual and audio. The app also has a tab titled “Know Your Rights” which details essential rights one should know. Essentially this app is very resourceful/useful and you should definitely get it!

2) Warrants are important. A warrant is absolutely necessary to search anything, your residence or your house. Courts don’t like when police officers search without warrants and anything they find without a warrant isn’t admissible in court, aka it’s a waste of everyone’s time. Take time to read over the warrant and make sure that it has your address on it, not just a general location.

3) Keep communication short and simple. Keep the conversations with law enforcement brief, direct, and only answer questions asked of you. If you are in a situation in which you are  read your rights, the only words you should be saying are “I want to speak to my attorney”.  You don’t have to speak but you should comply.

4) Keep calm and know your rights.  If you are being pulled over and you feel it is unsafe to do so, it is in your rights to put on your hazards and call 911 to notify them that you are pulling over to a protected area. If you’re ever accused of being under the influence you can request a witness be present.

In most situations law enforcement will treat you right, but it is important to know your rights!

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Stomping out the Stereotypes

As does anyone who is not a white heterosexual male, women face stigmas and stereotypes in our society. Those stereotypes can manifest themselves through various ethnic, social, sex, gender, and class issues. Socially ingrained presumptions affect all aspects of women’s lives, from the workplace to the familial and romantic relationships. Continue reading Stomping out the Stereotypes

Abortion in America- “Genocide Awareness Project”

For the past two days at UNC, a non-campus affiliated organization called “Genocide Awareness Project” (GAP) set up posters and handed out flyers on Polk Place (the main quad) on campus. When I first saw them setting up bright, orange signs I thought it was for Holocaust awareness. I’d had friends last week standing in the Pit (UNC’s outdoor hub) reading names of Holocaust victims for 24 hours. I assumed it was work continuing for victims of genocide, particularly the Holocaust.
Continue reading Abortion in America- “Genocide Awareness Project”

Socioeconomic Status and its Impact on Education

On Tuesday, HYPE – which stands for Helping Youth by Providing Enrichment – had a general body meeting during which Kari Kozlowski, a sociology doctoral candidate at the University of North Carolina, came to speak about socioeconomic status and how it impacts students throughout their educational careers. The meeting was very interactive in nature; rather than give a lecture, Kozlowski elected to split everyone at the meeting into groups and work on a simulation. Continue reading Socioeconomic Status and its Impact on Education

Punishment and Privatization: Debunking the Prison Industrial Complex

Over the past week, the Criminal Justice Awareness and Action committee put on several events for their Criminal Justice Reform Advocacy week. Many students may have seen the replica solitary confinement cell in the pit last week; that was part of CJAA’s program, which also included a one-woman show on domestic violence, an art benefit night, and several discussions on other criminal justice-related topics. Continue reading Punishment and Privatization: Debunking the Prison Industrial Complex

Using the Restroom Shouldn’t be this Hard

Picking a restroom has probably never been a struggle for you. You find the male or female stall and walk right in. No trouble. But imagine a situation where the signs on the wall are not male or female. There are two signs and you don’t fit into either of them. That’s unfair. Continue reading Using the Restroom Shouldn’t be this Hard

Spell(ings) Check

A few weeks ago, Margaret Spellings started her job as the new UNC system president. However, she was not welcomed with open arms and smiles. Instead, several college campuses planned and executed a walkout to protest Spellings. Continue reading Spell(ings) Check

Global Music Outreach Internship

Carolina offers us many opportunities to travel the world and expand our horizons. Those opportunities make take the shape of study abroad classes, internships, or even grants to financially support our travels. That being said, the Global Music Outreach Internship is a unique opportunity in so many ways. For one, the internship was founded by Carolina students themselves. One of the co-founders, junior Laura Limarzi, shared with me that while the program started as a project from Nourish, a Campus Y organization, it is now able to send 2-4 interns to Tanzania annually. Continue reading Global Music Outreach Internship

The Black Muslim Experience

As part of a three event series on people of African descent, presented through a collaborative effort by the Campus Y, BSM, MSA, and OASIS, Tae Brown led a panel of Black Muslims to discuss their experiences as they relate to their identity. The three panelists were able to give insight on the life of the average Black Muslim in America, and raise interesting points concerning their view of how they fit within their community. Continue reading The Black Muslim Experience

The Relaunch of Hunger Lunch

This past Wednesday on March 2nd, Nourish UNC, a college chapter that is part of Nourish International and seeks to organize students and communities to reduce poverty around the world, relaunched Hunger Lunch, the most important event for this organization. Between 11:00 and 2:00, Vimala’s Curryblossom Café helped bring students basmati rice, chickpea curry, and naan for the cheap price of $5.50. This will continue to happen every Wednesday at the same time for the foreseeable future. After the event, Hannah Smith, the Hunger Lunch Director, agreed to answer some questions about the relaunch of Hunger Lunch and its connection to the organization. Continue reading The Relaunch of Hunger Lunch