Category Archives: Diversity

Know Your Rights: Dos and Don’ts

Last Thursday, The Black Student Movement and the Campus Y co-hosted an event offering non-official advice for what students should and should not do when interacting with the police.

The event featured a panel consisted of Ada Wilson-Suitt, who currently serves as Director of Inclusive Student Excellence at UNC and previously was a practicing attorney.  The panel also featured Michael Jones and Ariel Smallwood, both second year law students at the UNC School of Law and President and Vice President of Black Law Student Association respectively.

The panelists wanted to make it clear they are not experts, but still gave excellent advice. Here are some of their tips:

1) Download the ACLU app. The app has a built in recording device that records both visual and audio. The app also has a tab titled “Know Your Rights” which details essential rights one should know. Essentially this app is very resourceful/useful and you should definitely get it!

2) Warrants are important. A warrant is absolutely necessary to search anything, your residence or your house. Courts don’t like when police officers search without warrants and anything they find without a warrant isn’t admissible in court, aka it’s a waste of everyone’s time. Take time to read over the warrant and make sure that it has your address on it, not just a general location.

3) Keep communication short and simple. Keep the conversations with law enforcement brief, direct, and only answer questions asked of you. If you are in a situation in which you are  read your rights, the only words you should be saying are “I want to speak to my attorney”.  You don’t have to speak but you should comply.

4) Keep calm and know your rights.  If you are being pulled over and you feel it is unsafe to do so, it is in your rights to put on your hazards and call 911 to notify them that you are pulling over to a protected area. If you’re ever accused of being under the influence you can request a witness be present.

In most situations law enforcement will treat you right, but it is important to know your rights!

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Punishment and Privatization: Debunking the Prison Industrial Complex

Over the past week, the Criminal Justice Awareness and Action committee put on several events for their Criminal Justice Reform Advocacy week. Many students may have seen the replica solitary confinement cell in the pit last week; that was part of CJAA’s program, which also included a one-woman show on domestic violence, an art benefit night, and several discussions on other criminal justice-related topics. Continue reading Punishment and Privatization: Debunking the Prison Industrial Complex

The Power of Social Media

As protesters gather in the streets, from Ferguson to Chapel Hill, it seems increasingly evident that we are on the cusp of another Civil Rights Movement, a “Third Reconstruction” as Reverend Barber calls it. One of the greatest tools activists can use is social media. This unprecedented way to transform movements, to garner support, takes the protesting occurring on the streets and continues it on Twitter feeds across the nation. Our country’s residents are more connected than we have ever been. Yes, this has spawned a wave of “slactivism.” But it has also spawned a media revolution. Continue reading The Power of Social Media

Black Liberation Teach-In Series Presents: Afrofuturism

For this event, UNC Black Liberation decided to go with the title This World Ain’t Our Home: Afro-Futurist Galaxies of Black Art and Thought. As someone who knew very little of Afrofuturism, I was interested to see exactly how the event unfolded, and I was not disappointed. Continue reading Black Liberation Teach-In Series Presents: Afrofuturism

Using the Restroom Shouldn’t be this Hard

Picking a restroom has probably never been a struggle for you. You find the male or female stall and walk right in. No trouble. But imagine a situation where the signs on the wall are not male or female. There are two signs and you don’t fit into either of them. That’s unfair. Continue reading Using the Restroom Shouldn’t be this Hard

My Blackness is Not a Fetish

As I bounce back from Spring Break and try to readjust to campus life and responsibility, my mind keeps wandering back to easier times- my week-long adventure in Cancun. Six of my friends and I spent five days enjoying the beaches and day parties in Mexico without a care in the world…somewhat. There’s always a wall up as a young woman in a foreign country where there is a language barrier. You hear stories about careless college kids being snatched up in their drunken states never to be seen again. But we were confident that as long as we were careful and smart, we wouldn’t join the list of those missing. And yes, all seven of us made it back to the States in one piece. I’m grateful for these results, but there is one aspect that keeps creeping up in my mind: the sexualization. Continue reading My Blackness is Not a Fetish

Spell(ings) Check

A few weeks ago, Margaret Spellings started her job as the new UNC system president. However, she was not welcomed with open arms and smiles. Instead, several college campuses planned and executed a walkout to protest Spellings. Continue reading Spell(ings) Check

Global Music Outreach Internship

Carolina offers us many opportunities to travel the world and expand our horizons. Those opportunities make take the shape of study abroad classes, internships, or even grants to financially support our travels. That being said, the Global Music Outreach Internship is a unique opportunity in so many ways. For one, the internship was founded by Carolina students themselves. One of the co-founders, junior Laura Limarzi, shared with me that while the program started as a project from Nourish, a Campus Y organization, it is now able to send 2-4 interns to Tanzania annually. Continue reading Global Music Outreach Internship

Immigration Awareness Month Photo Campaign Q&A

Arc writer Morgan Howard talked with co-coordinator of the Immigration Awareness Month (IAM) Photo Campaign, Mayela Peralta, to discuss the campaign’s purpose and goal. The campaign started March 1st and will continue until the 31st. Continue reading Immigration Awareness Month Photo Campaign Q&A

Love Your Body Day

I was reminded last Wednesday that loving your body includes not just learning to love your body’s appearance, but also what good it is capable of doing.

On March 2nd, Omega Phi Beta Sorority Inc., UNC’s multi-ethnically based and Latina-oriented sorority, alpha Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Inc., UNC’s largest and only international Asian-interest sorority, and Alpha Pi Omega Sorority Inc., the first historically American Indian sorority, hosted “Love Your Body Day: An Open Mic Night” to celebrate bodies of all shapes, sizes, and colors. Continue reading Love Your Body Day