Category Archives: Discrimination

Punishment and Privatization: Debunking the Prison Industrial Complex

Over the past week, the Criminal Justice Awareness and Action committee put on several events for their Criminal Justice Reform Advocacy week. Many students may have seen the replica solitary confinement cell in the pit last week; that was part of CJAA’s program, which also included a one-woman show on domestic violence, an art benefit night, and several discussions on other criminal justice-related topics. Continue reading Punishment and Privatization: Debunking the Prison Industrial Complex

I’m A Little Tired Of Hearing The Name ‘Trump’”

Donald Trump is an overrated topic. At the speed he’s going, the nomination is bound to be his, meaning the American public and the global community will have to deal with his mouth and rhetoric until election time. This wouldn’t be too much of an issue if it weren’t only March. Insert side-eye emoji here. Continue reading I’m A Little Tired Of Hearing The Name ‘Trump’”

Black Liberation Teach-In Series Presents: Afrofuturism

For this event, UNC Black Liberation decided to go with the title This World Ain’t Our Home: Afro-Futurist Galaxies of Black Art and Thought. As someone who knew very little of Afrofuturism, I was interested to see exactly how the event unfolded, and I was not disappointed. Continue reading Black Liberation Teach-In Series Presents: Afrofuturism

Do You Even Know How To News?

November 13, 2015.   I remember getting the BBC News alert on my phone telling me that Paris had just been bombed. My mother called me to make sure I was watching the news (admittedly I am too cheap to pay for cable so I was live streaming the BBC special coverage), my roommate had no idea anything had happened, I was texting any of my friends that have interests in international relations or terrorism to make sure they knew what was going on.  Soon it was everywhere.  “Stand with Paris” became a trending topic on Facebook and everyone was changing his or her profile pictures.  It was like acknowledgement of the terror attack was the fashionable thing to do.  If someone didn’t change their picture they were obviously in support of ISIS, right? Continue reading Do You Even Know How To News?

Using the Restroom Shouldn’t be this Hard

Picking a restroom has probably never been a struggle for you. You find the male or female stall and walk right in. No trouble. But imagine a situation where the signs on the wall are not male or female. There are two signs and you don’t fit into either of them. That’s unfair. Continue reading Using the Restroom Shouldn’t be this Hard

My Blackness is Not a Fetish

As I bounce back from Spring Break and try to readjust to campus life and responsibility, my mind keeps wandering back to easier times- my week-long adventure in Cancun. Six of my friends and I spent five days enjoying the beaches and day parties in Mexico without a care in the world…somewhat. There’s always a wall up as a young woman in a foreign country where there is a language barrier. You hear stories about careless college kids being snatched up in their drunken states never to be seen again. But we were confident that as long as we were careful and smart, we wouldn’t join the list of those missing. And yes, all seven of us made it back to the States in one piece. I’m grateful for these results, but there is one aspect that keeps creeping up in my mind: the sexualization. Continue reading My Blackness is Not a Fetish

Spell(ings) Check

A few weeks ago, Margaret Spellings started her job as the new UNC system president. However, she was not welcomed with open arms and smiles. Instead, several college campuses planned and executed a walkout to protest Spellings. Continue reading Spell(ings) Check

The Inevitability of the School-To-Prison Pipeline

Imagine looking forward to the rest of your life in high school and the first image that comes to mind is the big, colossal prison complex down the road. For many of the youth today, this is a sad reality and path that has taken their life off track. This isn’t because a large amount of our youth are criminals or do drugs, but because of the system that has set it up to be the “school-to-prison” pipeline. The school-to-prison pipeline “refers to the policies and practices that push our nation’s schoolchildren, especially our most at-risk children, out of classrooms and into the juvenile and criminal justice systems.” This system is put in place through subtle yet dramatic policies that are in schools and the prison-industrial complex. Many of those are some that I’m sure your high schools had/have in place that you didn’t realize could have greater implications after high school.
Continue reading The Inevitability of the School-To-Prison Pipeline

The Black Muslim Experience

As part of a three event series on people of African descent, presented through a collaborative effort by the Campus Y, BSM, MSA, and OASIS, Tae Brown led a panel of Black Muslims to discuss their experiences as they relate to their identity. The three panelists were able to give insight on the life of the average Black Muslim in America, and raise interesting points concerning their view of how they fit within their community. Continue reading The Black Muslim Experience

I Should Have Wished You Happy Black History Month

To provide a little context: It was the night of February 20th and one my best friends had just turned 21. We spent a couple of hours at her apartment pre-game then bounced to TOPO and Linda’s for some cheese fries. The party split up around 1:30 AM and half of the group headed towards the MLK direction and two of my friends walked me home before catching an Uber back to their place. The three of us walk up through the McCorkle quad trying to hurry because of how cold it was. As we make our way through campus we start to pass Silent Sam, Davie Poplar and the rest of UNC’s most notable monuments. The only issue with this picture is what I witness next. Continue reading I Should Have Wished You Happy Black History Month